Householder Applications Checklist

Householder Applications Checklist

Householder Applications Checklist

There is a checklist here you can download and complete, and send in as a document with your application.

 

Validation Requirements 

Please refer to the table on page 1 of the pdf for the Validation Requirements both National and Tyne and Wear.

Please note: The following documents may be requested during pre-application discussions, or where no discussions have taken place following validation of the application.

On validation - If the requested detail is judged to be critical in determining whether permission should be granted or not, and the applicant / agent is unable to submit the information within a specified timescale the authority may be left with no option but to refuse the application due to lack of information.

Please be aware that the householder checklist does not apply to the temporary provisions introduced by the Government in relation to larger single-storey rear extensions, of between four and eight metres for detached houses and between three and six metres for all other houses, which are subject to simplified application to be made under the Neighbour Consultation Scheme. To find out more about this process and how to apply go to section 7.

 

National and Local Validation Requirement Notes to accompany checklists

National Validation Requirements

Completed Application Form

All of the relevant questions should be responded to, or the words “Not Applicable” or N/A should be inserted for clarity. See: “4. Ownership Certificates” below with regard to certificates on the form.

The Government wishes to encourage the submission of applications electronically wherever possible, as this provides opportunities for streamlining procedures and reducing costs. Electronic applications may be made via the Planning Portal www.planningportal.co.uk.

Where applicants wish to make application in paper form, the original of the completed application form, plus one additional copies must be submitted. The same applies to all other plans and information that accompanies an application submitted in paper form i.e. a total of two sets are required for the application to be valid.

 

Location Plan

All applications must include copies of a location plan based on an up-to-date map. This should be at an identified standard metric scale (1:1250 or 1:2500). The location plan should identify sufficient roads and/or buildings on land adjoining the application site to ensure that the exact location of the application site is clear. The application site should be edged clearly with a red line. It should include all land necessary to carry out the proposed development – for example, land required for access to the site from a public highway, visibility splays, landscaping, car parking and open areas around buildings. A blue line should be drawn around any other land owned or controlled by the applicant, close to or adjoining the application site.Applicants should note that the copying of Ordnance Survey plans by unauthorised persons is an infringement of copyright.

 

Site Plan (Existing and Proposed)

All applications should normally include existing and proposed site plans at a standard metric scale (typically 1:100 or 1:200).

The site plan(s) should be numbered.

An existing site plan should accurately show:

  • The direction of north;
  • The footprint of all existing buildings on site with written dimensions and distances to the site boundaries.

The following information should also be shown, unless these would not influence or be affected by the proposed development:

  • All the buildings, roads and footpaths on land adjoining the site including access arrangements;
  • All public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site;
  • The position of all existing trees on the site, and those on adjacent land;
  • The extent and type of any hard surfacing;
  • Boundary treatment including the type and height of walls or fencing.

A proposed site plan should accurately show:

  • The direction of north;
  • The footprint of the proposed development (where applicable) and all buildings to be retained with written dimensions and distances to the site boundaries. The following information should also be shown, unless these would not influence or be affected by the proposed development:
  • All the buildings, roads and footpaths on land adjoining the site including access arrangements;
  • All public rights of way crossing or adjoining the site;
  • The position of all proposed trees and those to be retained on the site, and those on adjacent land;
  • The extent and type of any hard surfacing;
  • Boundary treatment including the type and height of walls or fencing.

Ownership Certificates (A, B, C or D as applicable)
 

The relevant certificates concerning the ownership of the application site must accompany all forms of applications.

For this purpose an ‘owner’ is anyone with a freehold interest or a leasehold interest if the unexpired term of which is not less than 7 years.

• Certificate A must be completed when the applicant is the sole owner of the site.

• Certificate B must be completed when the applicant is not sole owner of the site but all of the owner(s) of the site are known. The applicant needs to serve written notice on the person(s) who, on the day 21 days before the date the application is submitted was an owner of any part of the land to which the application relates. A copy of this notice must be sent to the LPA (included in the planning application).

• If Certificate B has been completed, the applicant needs to serve written notice on the person(s) who on the day 21 days before the date the application is submitted was an owner of any part of site (apart from the applicant). A copy of this notice must be included with the planning application.

• Certificate C must be completed when some of the owners of the site are known but not all. If Certificate C has been completed, written notice must be served on the known owners of the site in question in the same way as the procedure under Certificate B and a copy sent to the LPA with the planning application. There is also a requirement for the applicant to advertise the proposal in a local newspaper and this must not take place earlier than 21 days before the date of the application.

• Certificate D must be completed when none of the owners of the site are known. If Certificate D has been completed, the applicant is required to give notice of the proposal in a local newspaper. This must not take place earlier than 21 days before the date of the application and a copy of the notice must be included with the planning application The relevant notice templates are available from the Planning Portal website. For householder applications use: https://ecab.planningportal.co.uk/uploads/1app/notices/householder_noti… For other applications use: https://ecab.planningportal.co.uk/uploads/1app/notices/notice1.pdf https://ecab.planningportal.co.uk/uploads/1app/notices/notice2.pdf

 

Agricultural Land Declaration

All agricultural tenants on a site must be notified prior to the submission of a planning application. Applicants must certify that they have notified any agricultural tenants about their application, or that there are no agricultural tenants on the site. The certificate is required whether or not the site includes an agricultural holding. It is incorporated into the standard application form, and must be signed in order for the application to be valid.

No agricultural land declaration is required if the applicant is making an application for the approval of reserved matters, renewal of temporary planning permission, discharge or variation of conditions, tree preservation orders, listed building consent, a lawful development certificate, prior notification of certain developments with permitted development rights, a non-material amendment to an existing planning permission, or express consent to display an advertisement.

 

The correct fee

Most applications incur a fee and they cannot be validated without the correct fee being paid.

The Planning Portal includes and a fee calculator and a fee schedule for applicants, although each Local Planning Authority is able to advise applicants on specific cases and payment methods. These can be found at: https://www.planningportal.co.uk/info/200126/applications/59/how_to_app…

Note: For the purposes of fee calculation floor space is taken to be the gross amount (all storeys, including basements and garaging) to be created by the development. This is an external measurement including thickness of external and internal walls.

 

Design and Access Statement (if required)

When is this required? 

  • In World Heritage Sites or in a conservation areas; i. the provision of one or more dwellinghouse ii. the provision of a building (or extension) where the proposed floor space is more than 100 square metres;
  • Applications for listed building consent

 

What information is required?

A Design and Access Statement sets out the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the development and how issues relating to access to the development have been dealt with. For Planning Applications they must:

  • Explain the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the development;
  • Demonstrate the steps taken to appraise the context of the development and how the design of the development takes that context into account;
  • Explain the policy adopted as to access, and how policies relating to access in relevant local development documents have been taken into account;
  • State what, if any, consultation has been undertaken on issues relating to access to the development and what account has been taken of the outcome of any such consultation; and
  • Explain how any specific issues which might affect access to the development have been addressed.
  • A description of any heritage asset affected, including any contribution made by their setting and the contribution made by the development to local character and distinctiveness

 

For Listed Building Consent applications they must:

  • Explain how the design principles and concepts that have been applied to the works take account of: o The special architectural or historic importance of the building;
  • The particular physical features of the building that reflect and illustrate the significance of the building ;
  • The building’s setting. Where appropriate a Design and Access Statement may also include a Heritage Statement (see requirement 15).

 

Application Plans

When is this required?

  • Elevation plans should be submitted for all applications where external alterations are proposed;
  • Floor plans, Site Sections and Site Levels should be submitted for applications where this would be expected to add to the understanding of the proposal;
  • Roof Plans should be submitted where there is an alteration to an existing roof or otherwise where this is expected to add to the understanding of the proposal.

 

What information is required?

All plans should be numbered.

  • (a) Existing and Proposed Elevations The drawings of the elevations should be at a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 and all external sides of the proposal must be shown, along with the proposed building materials and the style, materials and finish of windows and doors where possible. Where a proposed elevation adjoins another building/structure or is in close proximity the drawing should clearly show the relationship between the two buildings/structures and detail the positions of any openings on each property. Proposed blank elevations must also be included, if only to show that this is in fact the case.
  • (b) Existing and Proposed Floor Plans The submitted drawings should be at a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 and should explain the proposal in detail. Where existing buildings or walls are to be demolished, these should be clearly shown. The proposed development should be shown in context with the site boundary and any existing adjacent buildings including property numbers/names where appropriate.
  • (c) Existing and Proposed Site Sections and Site Levels Section drawings should be drawn at a scale of 1:50 or 1:100 showing how the proposed development relates to existing site levels and adjacent land (with levels related to a fixed datum point off site).
  • (d) Roof Plan A roof plan is used to show the shape of the roof, its location, and specifying the roofing material to be used, and should be drawn to a scale of 1:50 or 1:100.

 

 

Ecological Survey Assessment and Mitigation Report & Protected Species Survey

When could either of these be required?

Modification / demolition (including in part) of the following:

• Permanent agricultural buildings;

• Buildings with weather boarding, wooden cladding and/or hanging tiles within 200 metres of woodland or water;

• Pre-1960 buildings within 200 metres of woodland or water and pre-1919 buildings within 400 metres of woodland or water; buildings/structures of any age within or immediately adjacent to woodland and/or water;

• Tunnels, mines, kilns, ice houses, adits, military fortifications, air raid shelters, cellars and similar underground ducts and structures;

• Bridges, aqueducts and viaducts;

• Buildings known to support roosting bats.

 

Applications that would include the following:

• Floodlighting within 50 metres of woodland, water or hedgerows / lines of trees with an obvious connection to woodland or water;

• Works to fell or lop veteran trees, trees with obvious cracks, holes and cavities, or trees with a diameter greater than a metre at chest height;

• Major proposals within 500 metres of the perimeter of a pond, or 200 metres of rivers, streams, canals, lakes or other aquatic habitats such as wetlands;

• Minor proposals within 100 metres of a pond or adjacent to rivers, streams, canals, lakes or other aquatic habitats such as wetlands;  Proposals for wind turbines.

Applications affecting:

• Woodland, or hedgerows / lines of trees with an obvious connection to woodland or water;

• Gravel pits, quarries, natural cliff faces, or rock outcrops with crevices or caves;

• European protected sites or candidate sites: Special Protection Area (SPA) / Ramsar Site, Special Area of Conservation (SAC);

• Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI);

• Local Wildlife Sites (LWS);

• Local Nature Reserve (LNR)

• Wildlife Corridors;

• Site of Local Conservation Interest (SLCI);

• Priority habitats as defined in the UK Biodiversity Action Plan (BAP) (Refer to Local BAPs and the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act);

• A semi-natural habitat.

 

Exceptions:

A survey assessment & mitigation report may be waived if:

• Following consultation at the pre-application stage, it is confirmed in writing by the Council that a survey/report is not required;

• A reasoned risk assessment, undertaken by a suitably qualified ecologist, is submitted demonstrating that no protected species are present, or that none would be adversely affected by the proposal;

Please seek pre-application advice from the Local Planning Authority for clarification on when a survey or HRA screening opinion would be required.

 

What information is required?

Where a development has the potential to impact on priority and protected habitats or species e.g. bats or Great Crested Newts, appropriate surveys and assessments will be required with the application. Mitigation measures to negate harm may be required along with evidence of lack of alternative sites. The level of detail will vary according to the size of the development and the habitats and species concerned.

An Ecological Survey should contain the following information:

  • Up-to-date information of habitats on site and links to habitats off site;
  • Species present or likely to be present;
  • Records search, likely impacts, mitigation and opportunities for enhancement.

Depending on the results of the initial survey, further surveys may be required.

Where protected or priority species are known or have a reasonable likelihood of occurring, a detailed Protected Species Survey must be carried out by a suitably qualified and experienced ecological specialist. Failure to provide information on protected species at the outset can significantly delay the processing of your planning application whilst a survey is carried out, and could result in a need for design and layout changes that should have been taken into account in the original proposal.

Please note certain surveys can only be undertaken at certain times of the year. For further details please contact the Local Planning Authority at preapplication stage.

Where a development could impact upon a European Protected Site or candidate site a Habitat Regulation Assessment (HRA) will be required The HRA is an overall assessment process, which involves a number of stages including screening and Appropriate Assessment. The process seeks to identify any potential ‘likely significant effects’ (LSE) which may impact upon the designated site, either alone or in-combination with other plans and projects.

 

 

Flood Risk and Drainage Assessments

When is this required?

All planning applications for:

 

What information is required?

For both residential extensions and non-residential extensions of less than 250 square metres in a local authority identified critical drainage area and Flood Risk Zones 2 and 3, a simple flood risk assessment is required using the link below:

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/flood-risk-assessment-standing-advice#minor…

Otherwise, a Flood Risk Assessment should identify and assess the risks of all forms of flooding to and from the development and demonstrate how these flood risks will be managed, taking climate change into account.

A Flood Risk Assessment should include the following information:

Zone 1 • Existing flood risk to the site from localised sources & impact of development upon run off rates; • Design measures proposed to mitigate run off rates (SUDS).

Zone 2 • Existing flood risk to the site from all sources & potential impact of development upon flood risk only (High level assessment only); • Design measures proposed to mitigate risk of flooding, and their impact (details should include floor levels, ground levels, evacuation routes, SUDS.

Zone 3• Existing flood risk to the site from all sources (e.g. flood depth, flow routes, flood velocity, defence failure); • Potential impact of development upon flood risk; • Design measures proposed to mitigate risk of flooding, and their impact (details should include floor levels, ground levels, evacuation routes, SUDS).

 

Applications for new development in Flood Zones 2 and 3 should contain a sequential testing statement (except for householder extensions, non-residential extensions of less than 250sq. metres or renewable energy proposals) which should demonstrate to the local authority that there are no reasonably available alternative sites where the proposed development could be sited within an area of lower flood risk. It is recommended that applicants consider and apply the sequential approach prior to the submission of a full application to avoid unnecessary costs due to planning permission being refused.

The applicant needs to submit the following evidence to allow the local authority to consider the sequential test:

  • A written statement explaining the area of search;
  • A map identifying all other sites considered within lower areas of flood risk;
  • A written statement explaining why the alternative sites listed within lower areas of flood risk are not reasonably available.

However, if the sequential test is passed there are still some vulnerable types of development that should not normally be allowed in Flood Zones 2 and 3 unless there are exceptional circumstances. These circumstances are established by using the Exception Test. More information on this can be found at the relevant section of National Planning Practice Guidance on Flood Risk and Coastal Change - https://www.gov.uk/guidance/flood-risk-and-coastal-change)

For the exception test to be passed it has to satisfy each of the following three tests:

  • It must be demonstrated that the proposed development provides significant wider sustainability benefits to the community that outweighs flood risk;
  • The development must be on previously developed land;
  • A Flood Risk Assessment submitted with the application must demonstrate that the development will be safe without increasing flood risk elsewhere and where possible reduce flood risk overall.

 

 

Tree Survey and/or Statement of Arboricultural Implications of Development

When is this required?

Where a development site includes trees, where the canopies of trees on an adjacent site overhang the site boundary, or where there are street trees along the site frontage that would be affected by the development proposal.

What information is required?

All trees should be accurately shown on a scaled plan with the following information:

Species; height in metres; stem diameter in metres at 1.5 metres above adjacent ground level or immediately above the roof flare for multi-stemmed trees; branch spread in metres taken at north, south, east and west points; height in metres of the lowest part of the canopy above ground level.

However, the following details will also be required where a tree is protected by a TPO or the site is located in a Conservation Area: Age class (young, middle aged, mature, over-mature, veteran); physiological condition (e.g. good, fair, poor, dead); structural condition (e.g. collapsing, the presence of any decay and physical defect); preliminary management recommendations, including further investigation of suspected defects that require more detailed assessment and potential for wildlife habitat; estimated remaining contribution in years (e.g. less than 10, 10-20, 20-40, more than 40); category grading (see BS5837: 2012 Trees in Relation to Construction – Recommendations).

For all development proposals, it should be clearly identified which trees are to be felled, together with the reasons for removing those trees. Where trees are shown as to be retained, the means of protecting those trees during construction works will need to be specified. A suitably qualified and experienced arboriculturalist should prepare this information in accordance with BS 5837: 2012. This should include a tree survey, Tree Constraint Plan (TCP), Aboricultural Implications Assessment (AIA) and where appropriate an Aboricultural Method Statement (AMS) with a Tree Protection Plan.

Policy Background

Government policy or guidance:

• Paragraph 4.2.4 of BS 5837: 2012 ‘Trees in relation to construction - Recommendations’ offers advice on how to identify trees on adjacent land that could influence the development; • Sections 4 to 6 of BS 5837: 2012 contain detailed guidance on survey information and plans that should be provided. Using the methodology set out in the Standard should help to ensure that development is suitably integrated with trees and that potential conflicts are avoided; • Sections 7 to 12 of BS 5837: 2012 contain detailed guidance on protecting trees that are to be retained both within and outside the proposed site that could be affected by the development.

 

Is this page useful?
Is this page useful?